We get the government we deserve

Recently the wife of a friend of mine successfully wrote her Canadian citizenship test and soon will become a Canadian citizen.  Her writing of the test happened to coincide with the release of a new, revised Discover Canada study guide for the citizenship test by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. The release got the barest of notice in the media except for a momentary blip due to the Justin Trudeau political correctness flap over the use of the term "barbaric" in reference to the honour killings in the guide. Regardless, the two events in tandem piqued my curiosity. 

Being born in Canada and thus having my citizenship automatically conferred to me, I had only the vaguest understanding of what questions might be in the citizenship test. I got on-line and after a brief search downloaded the newest edition of the Discover Canada study guide.  As I thumbed through the guide, I was pleasantly surprised. It was a reasonable, easy to read and digest summation of all things Canadian in 68 pages; our rights and responsibilities, history, geography, economy and institutions.

Jacques Cartier (pictured below in a graphic from Discover Canada) was the first European to explore the St. Lawrence River and to set eyes upon present-day Quebec City and Montreal...

Jacques Cartier was the first European to explore the St. Lawrence River and to set eyes on present-day Quebec City and Montreal.


I thought back to my grade school days and the hodgepodge curriculum of the classes I sat through. I began to wonder about how I would have scored had I had to write the citizenship test.  My thoughts soon progressed to pondering over how well my fellow Canadian-born citizens would do. We most likely all received a similar level of civic education in childhood; a disjoint glom of social studies, history and geography classes. Some classes were lead by dedicated teachers whose passion made the past, present and future of Canada come alive. But more often than not I recall being taught those who clearly held no interest in teaching this subject matter and had the barest of education in Canadian studies. 

John Cabot, (pictured below in a graphic from Discover Canada), an Italian immigrant to England, was the first to map Canada’s Atlantic shore, setting foot on Newfoundland or Cape Breton Island in 1497 and claiming the New Founde Land for England. English settlement did not begin until 1610

John Cabot, an Italian immigrant to England, was the first to map Canada’s Atlantic shore, setting foot on Newfoundland or Cape Breton Island in 1497 and claiming the New Founde Land for England. English settlement did not begin until 1610.

Almost certainly very few of us had any further formal education beyond high school or perhaps junior high school as it has no longer been a requirement in seven of ten provinces to take a single class in history in high school in the past twenty years.  The Dominion Institute's Canada Day weekend polls have shown a depressing annual decline of our civic literacy. This would lead one to conclude that probably more than one in two Canadians would most likely fail the citizenship test if they were challenged by it. South of the border, the situation is sadly similar. 

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Canadian Citizenship Test

Congratulations on becoming Canadians. I am practicing the questions for my Canadian Citizenship Test.

The new test is more difficult

Last year's citizenship exam was quite easy, but since they launched the new study guide (which recently was updated - again!), it is full with dates and names that even most Canadians don't have a clue about. Try the online test and see for yourself... some questions are quite obscure...

I also passed my Canadian citizenship test

I just passed my test and personnally I opted for this very good online training program for the Canadian citizenship test called citizenshipsupport.ca. They really helped a lot, and now I am a happy Canadian! Maybe it's just me but I was really overwhelmed by the amount of information to remember, so I thought I would share my experience in case somebody else need some (good) help.

I have to agree with you that this test should be a nation-wide requirement. Cheers.