Girl Effect: a Vancouver discussion to empower girls globally

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What is the "girl effect"? It's the notion that when a girl has resources, she will reinvest them in her community at a much higher rate than a boy. Currently, less than two cents of every international aid dollar is directed to girls. Lacking an education, the only option for many girls is to marry early and bear children, yet investing in girls helps create health, wealth, and stability for societies at large. 
 
On Wednesday, Oct. 10, former City Councillor Ellen Woodsworth and  Lunapads founders Suzanne Siemens and Madeleine Shaw will speak at Girl Effect: Empowering Girls Globally, a free public dialogue at the Vancouver Public Library to commemorate the first UN's International Day of the Girl Child. Moderated by Vancouver Sun columnist Daphne Bramham, the discussion will centre around the ripple effects created when society invests in young girls with access to education, business, healthcare and civic politics.
  
When: Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, 6:30-9:00 p.m.
 
Where: Vancouver Public Library, Alice McKay Room
350 West Georgia Street, Vancouver V6B 6B1
 
Why: To raise awareness of UN’s first-ever International Day of the Girl Child
 
The event is co-sponsored by the Girl Effect YVR, United Nations Association in Canada, Plan Canada in support of their Because I Am a Girl campaign, and the Vancouver Public Library.
 

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