Climate Change

Spring forecast: increasingly cloudy...for decades

If you have enjoyed this spring’s monotony of grey, gloomy days, then you are going to just fall in love with the weather we are cooking up for the coming years. The latest climate simulations being...

Rewilding the World author Tim Flannery optimistic that humans will meet climate challenge

Evolutionary legacy of cooperation suggests that selfish upright apes may become Superorganism and Will Rewild the World

THE BIG GRAB Part 8: Scoring Own Goals

While most Canadians get serious about cutting climate pollution, our dirtiest province is cranking up pollution so fast that they're wiping out our gains.

THE BIG GRAB Part 7: Silence of the Plans

The Harper government has pledged to cut climate pollution. But its plan only covers 13 per cent of the required cuts -- and oil sands pollution will more than wipe out even that gain.

THE BIG GRAB Part 6: Falling Behind

Canada has fallen steadily behind the U.S. and other countries in maximizing wealth per tonne of climate pollution. That's putting our future prosperity -- and costs -- on the line.

THE BIG GRAB Part 5: Little Fish. Big Pond

Alberta's oil sands are a huge project. But are they a big part of the Canadian economy? And are they too big to have to play by the same rules as everyone else?

THE BIG GRAB Part 4: Dirtier by the Barrel

Oil sands boosters say the industry is getting cleaner. But the data says it's not: CO2 is rising per barrel and overall, the future looks even worse.

THE BIG GRAB Part 3: Fewer Jobs and GDP

The oil sands have a dirty little secret: They generate far fewer jobs and wealth per tonne of carbon dioxide than other industries.

Will Christy Clark kill BC's climate-change policies?

B.C. politics is littered with the dashed careers of politicians left and right who tried to kill Campbell’s popular climate-change policies. Will Premier Clark be next?

THE BIG GRAB, Part 2: Elbows Out, Hogging the Pie

The oil sands are cranking up their carbon output as fast as ordinary Canadians are making cuts. But the companies don't plan on paying for more than their fair share.