Time to create a level playing field for all federal political candidates

It is unbelievable that Stephen Harper has taken steps to remove federal subsidies to political parties. This will officially make donations from individuals, lobbyists, and corporate influence a centerpiece of how politics is done in this country. In other words politial power will be shifting to the corporate elite and the rich. Great. 

There is a way to make federal politics more democratic, competitive, and accessible for the average citizen?

Here is a four step electoral reform plan which attempts to create a level playing field for all the federal political candidates.

1. Candidates can pay a deposit to the private banks in exchange for a campaign loan.

2. Candidates can submit their campaign receipts to the bank after the election.

3. The elections office can reimburse the banks for all official campaign expenses up to a pre-set maximum spending limit for all candidates.

4. The elections office can produce an elections website which would list the biographies, community experience, and qualifications of all the candidates. This would provide an unbiased source of information for the voters to quickly compare candidates. 

 

There you go! Simple and straightforward. This four step electoral reform plan will be a huge step forward in ensuring the best interests of the citizens are reflected in government policy and decision making.

 

More importantly, it would reduce the influence that big money and corporations have on the political process. Time for Harper to create a level playing field for all political candidates.

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