Older diesel engines must be registered now to avoid Metro Vancouver prohibition

“Diesel engine exhaust is a known carcinogen that is responsible for two-thirds of the lifetime cancer risk from air pollution in our region,” says Moore.

Metro Vancouver will enforce new operating prohibitions

In order to continuously improve air quality in our region and protect human health, Metro Vancouver will enforce new operating prohibitions for non-road diesel engines starting in January, according to a press release.

Older non-road diesel engines that have little or no emission controls are the main concern of the bylaw. Engines in machines like excavators, forklifts and generators are examples of those included in the bylaw, which has been in effect since 2012.

“Implementation and enforcement of this bylaw is the single most important step we can take to improve air quality in our region and protect residents’ health,” said Chair of Metro Vancouver’s Board of Directors Greg Moore in the release.

“Diesel engine exhaust is a known carcinogen that is responsible for two-thirds of the lifetime cancer risk from air pollution in our region. It is vital that these operating prohibitions come into effect,” he added. “The prohibitions that come into effect in 2015 are essential to protect human health by reducing emissions of harmful diesel soot from industrial and construction machines.”

Tier 0 engines (typically manufactured before 2000) must be registered with Metro Vancouver before January 1. All Tier 0 engines not registered by that time will be prohibited from operating in the region, and will no longer be permitted to register. These prohibitions are the strictest to date.

“Metro Vancouver is offering a rebate program so that the dirtiest engines will no longer operate and pollute our air,” he added.

Metro Vancouver staff are available to assist engine owners and operators to comply with the bylaw, and to determine the possible rebate for retiring engines by calling 604-432-6200 and asking for information about Bylaw 1161. Failure to comply with the bylaw could result in fines up to $200,000.

See the Video on the Non-Road Diesel Engine Bylaw.

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