Jeb Bush wants to see Harper win the 2015 election

“I don’t know if it’s Prime Minister Harper or whoever the next — he may be re-elected,” Jeb Bush reportedly told a crowd in New Hampshire. "I, for one, would think that would be great."

Jeb Bush

Jeb Bush, brother of former U.S. President George W. Bush and likely presidential candidate for the Republican Party, said he wants to see Stephen Harper re-elected in Canada.

“I don’t know if it’s Prime Minister Harper or whoever the next — he may be re-elected,” Bush said Wednesday, the Toronto Star report. “I, for one, would think that would be great.”

Bush was using President Obama's relationship with Prime Minister Harper as an example of how relations between Canada and the U.S. cooled over the last few years. In a widely circulated Bloomberg article, Harper's aggressive lobbying for the Obama to approve TransCanada's controversial Keystone XL pipeline project created some tension between the two leaders.

“It’s hard to imagine how we could have a bad relationship with Canada, but under this administration we’ve managed to do it,” Bush said.

Jeb Bush's comments on Harper are the latest in a series of remarks on foreign policy. He recently told a group of investors that his top advisor for Middle East policy was his brother, George. He also said he would have gone to war in Iraq despite knowing that the country had no weapons of mass destruction.

 

 

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