Harper government announces plans to invest in seafood sector

The Canadian Pacific Kazunoko Association will receive $614,068 over three years to market "kazunoko", also known as herring roe, to buyers in Japan, China and Taiwan. 

Michelle James (left), MP Wai Young (centre) and Robert Katsura at Tojo’s Restaurant Photo by Sindhu Dharmarajah

More than $740,000 will be invested in the Canadian seafood sector to help expand into new global markets, Member of Parliament for Vancouver South Wai Young announced at Tojo’s Restaurant on Broadway.

The Canadian Pacific Kazunoko Association will receive $614,068 over three years to market "kazunoko", or herring roe, to buyers in Japan, China and Taiwan. The sector exported $31.8 million worth of products in 2013.

Kazunoko used in sushi

“Canadian Pacific herring roe has the top reputation in Japan for its taste and quality,” said the association’s president Robert Katsura in a news release. “The AgriMarketing Program lets us work with our Japanese customers to communicate that reputation to consumers and begin to build new markets outside Japan.”

In order to develop branding strategies, produce marketing tools and attend trade shows, the Underwater Harvesters Association will be receiving $130,000. 

“Every time we’re able to increase the value of our product in China, that comes right back here for better jobs and better sustainability of our industry in British Columbia,” said Underwater Harvesters executive director Michelle James.

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