Environmental assessment OK for proposed Woodfibre LNG project in B.C.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna
Environment Minister Catherine McKenna. Photo by Justin Tang/The Canadian Press.

OTTAWA — The federal government says an environmental assessment has determined that a proposed liquefied natural gas project near Squamish, B.C., is unlikely to cause significant adverse effects.

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says the Woodfibre LNG Project underwent a thorough, science−based assessment and that her decision was based on indigenous traditional knowledge and public feedback.

McKenna says British Columbia conducted the environmental assessment on behalf of both the federal and provincial governments, with participation from various federal authorities including Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

McKenna says an analysis of anticipated greenhouse gas emissions associated with the project was part of the review and the federal government conducted additional consultations with the public and indigenous groups.

The environment minister says Woodfibre must abide by legally binding conditions, including mitigation measures and follow−up requirements for the life of the project.

The next steps are for the proponent to obtain approvals and permits, including regulatory authorizations from the Fisheries Department and Transport Canada.

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