Economist Robyn Allan calls NEB process "rigged" and withdraws from Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain review

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“The board will say — because Kinder Morgan says — that a spill is ‘not likely’ and therefore we don’t have to consider the cost or the implications.”

Recently NEB chair and CEO Peter Watson addressed public concern over the review process in British Columbia where opposition parties, several major environmental organization and municipal leaders are calling on the provincial government to pull out of the federal process.   

Allan called the public outreach “duplicitous.”

“The public relations activities that Mr. Watson has been involved in are media spin,” she said. “It’s part of a strategy to lull the Canadian public into a sense of safety when none exists.”

Allan said intelligent Canadians don’t necessarily have the time to investigate the federal government’s review process. She felt she might be able to help: “from the beginning with my expertise and ability and concern I felt that was an effective role I could play.”

Now, after a year of pro bono engagement with the process, Allan says she can no longer participate in good faith.

“What I’ve concludes is the game is rigged, the National Energy Board is a captured regulator and their actions are putting the healthy and safety of the economy, society and environment at risk.” 


Robyn Allan Withdrawal Letter NEB May 19, 2015

This article originally appeared on DeSmog Canada.

 

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