Burnaby mayoral candidate promises to ban kissing in public

Burnaby mayoral candidate Sylvia Gung promises to ban kissing at wedding ceremonies and freeze wage hikes. 

Photo by Derek Σωκράτης Finch via Flickr https://flic.kr/p/oYzTJu

Burnaby mayoral candidate Sylvia Gung garners a lot of attention with her promises these days. Don’t expect to see couples kissing or holding hands in public, if Gung wins the civic election next month.

According to Gung’s mayor candidate profile, she intends to ban “behaviors that hints sex/ sexuality” (sic) such as the ‘kiss the bride’ moment at weddings.

Gung wrote that her goal was to establish a "wholesome society", which she feels has been lacking in Canada these days. She said she would also 'innovate' unions and PACs, which she called "backward organizations". A profile on Gung in the Burnaby Now describes her as an avid letter-writer and critic of Burnaby's current government. She told Burnaby Now in 2011 she feels directed by God to run for mayor.

Additionally, she promises to freeze taxes, halt pay hikes and remove the school board, which she accuses of shoving “its political agenda down the throat of the public education.”

Gung is one of six mayoral candidates this election, including current mayor Derek Corrigan, school trustee Helen Hee Soon Chang, realtor Raj Gupta, entrepreneur Daren Hancott, and longtime Burnaby resident Allen Hutton.

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