Best Buy commits to using "sustainable" paper, saying they wish to protect Canadian forests

For its paper purchases from Canada, Best Buy will shift business away from Resolute Forest Products and now require Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified paper from this supplier.

Best Buy does Better for Canada’s Forests, Commits to Sustainable Paper
Photos by Andy Arthur (left) and Ian Muttoo via Flickr

Today the world’s largest electronics retailer, Best Buy, announced major improvements to its paper supply chain to better protect Canada’s Boreal Forest, one of the lungs of our planet and a vital buffer against climate change.

During the busiest shopping time of the year the company committed to stronger purchasing standards, paying particular attention to endangered forests and human rights. The move comes less than two weeks into a Greenpeace campaign that mobilized over 52,000 supporters across North America.

“Today, Best Buy is doing better for our forests,” said Shane Moffatt, forest campaigner at Greenpeace. “And they are putting their words into action with their current suppliers. We look forward to collaborating on their new procurement policy to see this through.”

For its paper purchases from Canada, Best Buy will shift business away from Resolute Forest Products and now require Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified paper from this supplier. FSC certification provides a guarantee to the public that forests are being responsibly managed, First Nations rights are respected and biodiversity is conserved. Several of Resolute’s FSC certificates were suspended in 2014.

Greenpeace campaigns for a healthy Boreal Forest that can support communities and sustainable businesses. Canada’s ancient Boreal Forest contains an estimated 208 billion tonnes of carbon, 25% of the planet’s wetlands and iconic species such as caribou, wolverine and lynx. It is also is home to a number of Indigenous communities.  Canada recently emerged as the world’s worst country for loss of intact forests, largely in the Boreal Forest.

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