Careers with a grad degree in education go beyond K–12 classrooms

Graduate degrees in education aren't solely for teachers. A grad degree in Education at Simon Fraser University (SFU) can help you advance your career, no matter what that career is. 

Photo Courtesy Simon Fraser University (SFU).

Education means more than simply teaching. It encompasses learning, understanding, researching, training, and providing guidance and enlightenment. Education takes place within businesses, communities, organizations and industries on a daily basis. Improving these skills in your field of expertise can open doors within that field or help you prepare for a career change.

For example, recent Curriculum & Instruction Foundations MA graduate and executive director of the non-profit PACE Society, Laura Dilley began her career by first undertaking BA degrees in Economics and Education. Within days of defending her MA thesis, Laura was named one of Business Vancouver’s Top Forty under 40.

Randy Persad completed his M.Ed. degree in Curriculum & Instruction: Health Education and Active Living M.Ed. in July 2015. Randy had been working as a Registered Massage Therapist. The program allowed him to continue working full time and the topic matter resonated with his personal and professional goals. 

Since graduating, he has continued in his previous roles. His teaching and clinical practices have changed as he incorporates his new knowledge into his work. “My career was re-ignited so much so that I am sharing my program experience with other massage therapists.”

Victoria Lam works as an Educational Programming Coordinator at a non-profit organization working with schools and educators involved in the fundraising and awareness campaigns of the organization while studying in the Curriculum & Instruction: Equity Studies in Education MA, M.Ed. program.

While volunteering abroad, she “quickly realized the disparity in quality of education that I had received here in Canada as a student in comparison to the students in Vietnam I taught everyday.” and “Ultimately, that led to fueling my desire to get creative and create curriculum that is inclusive of youth coming from different walks of life and ensuring a safe space and healthy environment to learn is provided.” notes Victoria.

“I hope to continue my work in Equity Studies by creating more inclusive lesson plans and curriculum, based in informal education settings.”

Annette Rouleau has followed a much different trajectory, from a teacher to a researcher. She began her career teaching elementary school in Northern Alberta. When a Curriculum & Instruction: Numeracy M.Ed. program was offered in her community, she jumped at the chance to take the program where she met faculty members that would encourage and support her to apply for a PhD in Mathematics Education after she completed her master’s degree in 2014.

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