Vancouver Eco Fashion Week roundup: the best of local and international designers

Sustainable fashion was celebrated last week in the city's downtown core during Vancouver Eco Fashion Week. In its fourth season, the event was wildly successful, with standing room only in many of the runway shows, well attended seminars, and packed parties.

Vancouver designer Lindsay Walsh presented her line Standing Armed for the first time at Vancouver Eco Fashion Week. The showcase was well received by a crowd that allowed standing room only.

Sustainable fashion was celebrated last week in the city's downtown core during Vancouver Eco Fashion Week.

In its fourth season, the event was wildly successful, with standing room only in many of the runway shows, well attended seminars, and packed parties.

From Tuesday, April 10 to Thursday, April 12, UBC's Robson Square was transformed into a runway, becoming a temporary home to local and international designers promoting environmentally friendly fashions.  

Seminars covered a broad spectrum of topics: Value Village talked about the importance of donating used clothing and the incredible finds to be had at their chain, while Hootsuite emphasized how social media can help grow businesses - no matter their size.

Overall, the event showcased Vancouver as a trend-setting city on the eco-fashion front, and highlighted the city's creative talent.

Here's a rundown of the designers who graced the runway: 

International Designers

Prophetik
Headlining Eco Fashion Week was Prophetik, from Nashville, Tennessee. Jeff Garner designs the collections from his own spirit, infusing old world charm and techniques with new world fits and fabrics. "A gentleman is reborn to capture the essence of the classic sophisticated lady of the modern world," says the brand's site. "He brings the romance back into fashion." Prophetik strives for sustainable solutions in all aspects of its design - from stamping business cards on recycled paper, to using bark to dye the clothes naturally.


La Isla

The swimwear and apparel brand, designed in California and made in Colombia, is a collection of colourful pieces featuring detailed hand embroidery. Its sustainable nature comes from both a human and environmental perspective. In Colombia, where the swimwear manufacturing is done, La Isla employs head of household women by bringing the fabric to their homes. This year, the brand has also partnered with Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Ocean Futures society, donating to their cause.



Bitru Fariel
Featuring handcrafted jewelry from Poland, the brand Bitru Fairel includes unique pieces made mostly from natural materials such as ordinary stones, pumice, cinnamon, coconut shell, coral and leaves collected from all around the world. The brand uses ‘specific’ materials, such as coins, wires, electrical cables, shell casings, protective flexible corrugated conduit, nails and extension cords. The brand describes its pieces not as classic jewelry, but as "show jewelry" which could be used as a backdrop for film, a TV show or special fashion events.


Svensk
Based in Sweden, Svensk is proud to use all organic materials, and produces its items in an environmentally friendly way. The knitwear line mixes outdoor and urban living. Svensk products are manufactured in South America with cooperatives who help local communities to set fair prices for their products. The cooperative consists of large and small alpaca breeders and individual artisans who knit their products from their home.

 


Kreati-Ka
The line offers original designs for women who emphasize a desire to look different and elegant. The use of silk and wool is prominent in the collection, as is the inspiration of "nature combined with the beauty of women." The women's private label collection features high-end cocktail and evening styles created by Kathy Sabin-Mensah, a French designer living in Seattle. The line in conscious to minimize the use of materials, and uses electronic media for as many aspects as possible.

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