Real Housewives of Vancouver Mary Zilba says: "Spank the right people"

Mary Zilba

Mary Zilba, the heart-broken divorcee in The Real Housewives of Vancouver, says she's a chicken when it comes to dating. 

"I'm kind of afraid to date.  If you find someone for me, I'll make you the maid of honour," she tells a reporter.

The former Miss Ohio jokes about currently not dating anyone, adding that she's "looking for prospects."

On the 12th floor of the luxurious Loden Hotel on Melville Street, the scene is surreal. Zilba texts on her handheld, while co-stars walk in and out of the room. The show's publicist hovers nearby.

"Dale McKay is kind of cute. He's Canada's 'Top Chef'. He just texted me," Zilba, a self-confessed "tweetaholic" offers, adding that she probably tweets more than any of the other Real Housewives of Vancouver.

Zilba is also a proud mother. She gushes about one of her sons who drove her to the Loden that morning. Her proud moment is interrupted as her friend and co-star Christina Kiesel walks into the room. "Does anyone have a brush by any chance?" No one does.

Zilba, whose distress over her divorce is scrutinized repeatedly during outings and social gatherings by the Real Housewives in the the first two episodes, says the show has healed her heart. 

"It got me over the heartbreak."

She's even gotten to be friends again with her ex.

Zilba had a serious relationship after her marriage, she says, but it didn't work out. It's unclear who broke her heart, her boyfriend or her ex-husband, but whoever it was, she's healing well, thanks to the show. 

"I was in a relationship after my marriage for almost five years," she said. "He broke up with me. It took me a while to get over that heartbreak, so when we started filming, I was still getting over that."

And the relationship that came after her husband wasn't exactly golden either.

"When I was in my previous relationship, he didn't let me have any relationship at all with my ex-husband," Zilba divulged. "So, it's a renewal."

"It probably alludes to why I was asked the questions I was asked and being picked on," Zilba referred to the opening chapters of the episodes.

No more of that heartache, though.

"We have a really good relationship," Zilba said, speaking of her ex. The two recently vacationed with their boys for the first time in a while. "The boys were so happy. They loved it."

Spank the right people

She says she  heard someone say that the show was the worst thing to happen to Vancouver.

"I started to read a lot of negative commentary. It really hurt."

Zilba is a former pop singer, with eight albums under her belt -- she's used to being judged on her music and her interviews. But she has never been judged as harshly as she has for the Real Housewives of Vancouver, she says. 

"Here, they're judging you and they have no idea who you are. They are judging you because of the stigma of the show, and that's bothersome to me. Didn't your parents teach you not to judge a book by its cover?"

For the record, Zilba says, that the real worst thing to happen to Vancouver is not her show, but the Vancouver Canucks' Stanley Cup final loss and the looting and riots that happened after.

"That's worse. They just destroyed (Vancouver). I would spend more time spanking those people than us. This is just a nouveau soap opera."

Being a mom: the greatest accomplishment

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