Hamish Stewart

Hamish Stewart is the Legal Programme Manager at the Asset Owners Disclosure Project. All views and opinions expressed here are his alone.

Time for the UBC Board of Governors to address portfolio climate risk?

This week the UBC Board of Governor’s provisionally rejected calls by faculty and staff to divest the university endowment funds from fossil fuels. Yet in calling on their lawyers to address the...

Here's a letter from my MLA defending the cruel practice of trophy hunting in B.C.

Here's a letter from my MLA defending the cruel practice of trophy hunting in B.C.
Fraser Surrey docks

Fraser Surrey docks: a stranded asset in the making?

Could investments in the Surrey Fraser Docks (SFD) coal port expansion be wasted capital? Is projected future demand for US coal just a mirage? In spite of poor project economics, structural decline...
Canadian pension trustees and climate risk

Canadian pension trustees and climate risk: if they only had a strategy?

In this list of global investment gorillas, the pension fund industry should be the most active in addressing climate change risks and opportunities.
Photos (of Stephen Poloz) by Bank of Canada - Banque du Canada and Kris Krug

What could the Bank of Canada do to assess carbon risks in our national economy?

The Bank of England is proceeding with its review of the risks to financial stability associated with over-valued fossil fuel companies. Shouldn’t Stephen Poloz, the Governor of the Bank of Canada,...
An impoverished, oily future for Canadians. infrastructure, renewable energy

An impoverished, oily future for Canadian pensioners?

Recent research published in the journal Nature details the locations and amounts of the world’s fossil fuel reserves that will need to remain unburned if we are to keep on a 2oC warming trajectory...
Napoleon, carbon pricing and the cost of uncertainty in Canada

Napoleon, carbon pricing and the cost of uncertainty in Canada

What would a $30/ton price on carbon in 2016 mean for Canada’s fossil fuel exports, and for the national economy? The answer: serious changes.
strong environmental regulations mean a more competitive economy

News flash: strong environmental regulations mean a more competitive economy

Environmental regulations encourage firms to cut pollution by raising the cost of polluting, making them more efficient and eventually leading to cost savings.
Why BC’s future should be a geothermal one. Photo by Lydur Skulason via Flick

Why BC’s future should be a geothermal one

If BC leaders took a trip to Reykjavik in Iceland, they could learn how the city benefits from the largest district heating system in the world.