Carrie Saxifrage

Carrie Saxifrage is the author of The Big Swim, a collection of nonfiction stories centered on community in the age of climate change to be released in February by New Society Books.  Ruth Ozeki has called The Big Swim, "utterly delightful - a laugh out-loud, moving book I will share with people everywhere I go."  Carrie Saxifrage was the Sustainability Reporter for The Vancouver Observer for four years, before moving on to a career as a book writer.

 

Why does logging trump tourism in the Discovery Islands and Desolation Sound?

Jack Springer of Campbell River Whale Watching has a primarily European clientele. “It’s very difficult to explain to them what is going on here,” he said.

Port Metro Vancouver’s two faces: independent decision maker that supports coal lobbyists

The Port of Metro Vancouver belongs to the Coal Association of Canada and, through the Gateway Council, to the Coal Alliance.

PlasticShore: Victoria's youthful ecoprenuers take on marine pollution

Ecopeneurs from PlasticShore display construction material that includes plastic collected from the west coast of Vancouver Island.

In Canada, insurance companies becoming climate stability allies

The Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction, established by Canadian Insurance companies, assessed climate risks for the Insurance Bureau of Canada in a report titled Telling the Weather Story.

International Energy Agency warns pension funds about “unburnable carbon”

The IEA asked pension funds to look at the risk from overvalued fossil fuel stocks.

Preston Manning's advice on how to approach Conservatives about climate change

Jeffrey Simpson questions why the Harper government, which favours market solutions, has chosen to address climate change with regulations.

Dr. Katie Gibbs: Scientists call for evidence based decisions by governments

Dr. Katie Gibbs is the executive director of a new science advocacy group called "Evidence for Democracy" which advocates using science to develop public policy.

Adventure in the melting Arctic: Vancouver-based team to row the Northwest Passage

At the Tuesday race at Deep Cove, the team rowed about 11 km/hour. In the Arctic, they could average about 3 km/hour. They will row 24/7 through the endless days, probably in four hour shifts.

Port of Metro Vancouver breaks promise to youth

Last February, the Port of Metro Vancouver promised Kids for Climate Action a forum for a full debate on the Surrey-Fraser coal terminal proposal. Did they deliver?

Divestment may protect from 40-60% overvaluation of fossil fuel stock

Kitsilano Pool underwater: a growing number of cities want to divest from their own destruction