Amy Huva

Amy Huva is an environmental chemist and writer from Melbourne, Australia who worked for the Australian Federal Government on agricultural water reform and the Montreal Protocol. She is currently working in the environmental sector in Vancouver, Canada.

 

Polluting the three most important things in life

I’m visiting China for the first time this week, and the scale of the pollution has really shocked me.

Post Carbon Pathways: how to dodge a climate change bullet

We know what we need to do to solve climate change. This report launched last week aims to start building a pathway to get there.

Dealing with climate change denial, Australian-style

What happens when a climate denier starts trying to shout his point at an Australian climate report launch?

Onboard the solar train

April First was not only April Fools Day; it was also the second birthday of the solar panels on the roof of my parents' house in Australia.

Crash Diets and Carbon Detoxes: Irreversible Climate Change

Much of the changes humans are causing in our atmosphere today will be largely irreversible for the rest of the millennium.

Climate changes before I retire

This is no longer about the pollution and climate you’re leaving your children. This is about the choices we face today and the consequences for our planet’s liveability before I retire.

What’s in a standard deviation?

We are causing changes to happen so quickly in the earth’s atmosphere that something that would have taken over 11,000 years has just happened in the last 100.

The all-you-can-eat-buffet of planet earth

We need to start living within our means and stop believing in the myth of human exceptionalism where we think we can decouple ourselves from the ecosystems within which we live.

Electricity: you don’t know what you’ve got 'til it’s gone

As the climate crisis nears, if cities haven’t diversified and decentralised the electricity grid, we could end up with serious disruptions to our lives and our livelihoods.

Arctic madness

Are we so blinded by our fossil fuel addiction that no-one can see that getting excited about a melting Arctic because you can mine it is suicidal?