BC Hydro seeks small scale biomass electricity projects

BC Hydro may soon be partnering up with local municipalises or energy groups to produce biomass energy for local communities.

The company announced today that they are looking for new biomass energy projects that will benefit local BC communities, and provide eco-friendly power to BC Hydro.

Biomass energy comes from organic materials, including straw, wood products, food scraps or forest waste, and is based entirely off of renewable resources

The initiative sprung from the 2007 BC Energy Plan put forward by the government of British Columbia to create alternative renewable power sources.

“We are encouraging communities, first Nations, Municipalities and renewable power producers to put forward their ideas for small scale electricity productions,” said Dag Sharman, Media Relations of BC Hydro, who believes the project, has been in the making for about a year.

BC Hydro will be looking for projects that provide “Carbon Neutral biomass sources”, according to a BC Hydro Press Release, and will only be excepting project smaller than five megawatts of power.

“They will use carbon neutral biomass fuel sources to provide cost effective power to us, to the BC Hydro grid,” Sharman said. “That will create local or regional economic benefits as well.”

“We will also be looking for projects that provide additional benefits to the local community such as improved reliability.”

More in Environment

Pavlof Volcano erupting in Alaska on March 26, 2016.

Flights cancelled in and out of Regina, Yellowknife after volcano in Alaska

VANCOUVER — More flights have been cancelled after a cloud of ash spewed from a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. WestJet spokeswoman Lauren Stewart said the airline cancelled three flights from...
Canada geese mating ritual

Egg addling program shakes up Canada geese population in Okanagan

VERNON, B.C. — Airborne flocks of Canada geese can be symbols of beauty and freedom, but the mess they leave behind on landing can quickly foul parks and beaches. The Okanagan hosts large numbers of...
Speak up about this article on Facebook or Twitter. Do this by liking Vancouver Observer on Facebook or following us @Vanobserver on Twitter. We'd love to hear from you.