Katie Jeanes inspires "A Little More Good"

A Little More Good founder Katie Jeanes (center)

To make a significant impact in our community, all it takes is one person to take action with a great idea. Using her passion for volunteering and educational background (Human Movement from the University of Queensland and her Bachelors degree from UBC), 24 year old Katie Jeanes is an inspirational example of someone starting a powerful movement.

In late 2010, I had the privilege of meeting Jeanes at the launch of the Young Women in Business (YWiB) SFU Project Give where I signed on as a mentor for a group of young women looking to enhance their portfolios and give back to the community. Jeanes was covering the day's activities for an article on her website, A Little More Good (ALMG).

Within a week of meeting, she had emailed me for more information on the Passion Foundation and how she could help spread the word.

When you first meet Jeanes, you will notice her personable energy right away. She has a smile that will automatically put you at ease and make you want to start a conversation. She is thoughtful, intelligent and has a do-good approach to life.

Three weeks ago, Jeanes informed me that she had made the decision that all the proceeds from her launch party, in partnership with Social City Networking, would go to the Passion Foundation. Jeanes indicated that more girls and young women need programs like Passion Projects to enhance who they are and what they can do in the world. "The grassroots feel is what ALMG is all about." Jeanes stated that she wasn't sure how much would be raised but wanted to help out. "Mark it in your calendar," she told me.

On January 19, 2011, I entered the packed Club 560 Art Lounge. I was amazed at the diverse attendees; over 450 people came together to celebrate the official launch of A Little More Good. "It was completely unexpected and indescribably humbling," Jeanes stated. 


Donations were raised by entrance, cash bar, 50/50 and an amazing silent auction with items from such companies as Lululemon, Ethical Deal, ING Direct, Sitka, Caramel Salon, Canucks Autism Network, Steve Nash Fitness, YYOGA, Sam Jeanes Photography, The Eatery, Luxe Beauty Bar, Light, and Soul Collective.

I received an email from Jeanes last week stating that the launch raised $1500.00 for the Passion Foundation, enough to offer a Passion Project to a school or community agency free of charge and just in time for our March mission to reach 100 girls over the next four months in the Vancouver area.

Jeanes started ALMG because she wanted to make it easier for people to get involved in the community and create positive change. 

She has received stories from as far off as Australia (a young woman was inspired to donate blood because she saw one of Jeanes' videos online) to local Vancouverites who have reported doing random acts of kindness and how it has changed their way of looking at the world.

When I asked Jeanes what she loves most about ALMG, her response was "I love More Good in the Hood the most. Inviting people to come with us to do a little more good and watching them light up as they create something good is my favourite part of my week."

What's Jeanes' biggest wish for ALMG? "That it helps people cross the gap between talking about issues and starting to do something about it."

For more information on ALMG, email [email protected]. They are currently seeking out corporate sponsorship so they can bring ALMG to slightly larger scale.

Jeanes also says they need people in the community who are doing good to let us know about their upcoming events so we can promote them and maybe do some good together.

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