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Tar sands vs. entire nations

(Page 2 of 2)
 

Compared to past national emissions

Historical CO2 emissions (1850 - 2008) for the world’s 185 nations can be found in the definitive World Resource Institute’s CAIT database. In my chart I’ve shown cumulative CO2 emissions for:

  • 150 Nations combined: This is all the combined CO2 ever emitted by the 150 least climate polluting nations. A full list of these nations is at the bottom in the notes section.

I also included in my chart seven individual nations which represent the major emitters. Here is a description of each, along with their cumulative CO2 ranking.  

  • Brazil (#21 in all time climate pollution). Brazil is the largest all-time climate polluter in South America and 21st largest in the world. Per person however they have emitted little historically, and are at #100 in the world for that ranking. Brazil has a typical profile for a major developing nation: a large population with each person having a fairly small climate footprint.
  • Canada (#9) is home to the tar sands. Turns out we are #9 in the world in total cumulative emissions both as a nation and per individual. Canada is typical of a wealthy developed nation: a smaller population but with each person having a very large climate footprint.
  • India  (#8) is home to a billion people. Despite being the eighth largest climate polluting nation in history, each person has one of the very lowest climate footprints. Indians rank way down at #122 out of 185 nations for both historical and current per capita emissions.
  • Japan (#6) has as nearly many people living in the Tokyo area as Canada has in our whole nation. Historical emissions per Japanese are less than half of Canadians.
  • Germany (#4) is the biggest total climate polluter in EU history. It just edges out the UK, but only because Germany has a larger population. Germans are #6 in cumulative per capita emissions which is even higher than Canadians. Today however Canadians emit almost twice as much per person as Germans.
  • China (#2) is the second largest climate polluting nation in history. The vast majority of that has been from burning coal. Until very recently, the Chinese emitted little per person. However in the last decade they have rapidly increased their emissions per person. They now emit more per person than the French, Italians, Spanish, Swedes or Swiss, for example. Estimates are that if recent trends continue their current emissions will pass up even the Americans – per person – within five years.
  • USA (#1) is by far and away the biggest cumulative climate polluter in history. It has single-handedly dumped close to a third of all global CO2. This is triple the amount of second place China. Only Luxembourg, out of the 185 nations, has emitted more per person since 1850 than Americans.

So there we are. The lower ERCB estimate shows the potential tar sands climate emissions significantly exceeds the historical emissions of every nation, except the USA. The higher Hansen estimate has the tar sands blowing by even the Godzilla of USA’s historical coal, oil and natural gas emissions.

“Carbon bomb”?

 


Notes:

(1) A full size version of this chart and supporting spreadsheet data can be found on my VisualCarbon website.

(2) The 150 nations that combined make up the “150 nations” bar are, in decreasing order of historical emissions:

Korea (North)

Thailand

Denmark

Egypt

Bulgaria

Slovakia

Greece

Malaysia

Pakistan

Finland

Switzerland

Iraq*

Azerbaijan

Nigeria

Serbia & Montenegro

Algeria

Colombia

United Arab Emirates

Philippines

Portugal

Norway

Turkmenistan

Chile

Ireland

Kuwait

Vietnam

Israel

New Zealand

Libya

Cuba

Syria

Estonia

Peru

Lithuania

Singapore

Morocco

Moldova

Croatia

Georgia

Trinidad & Tobago

Luxembourg

Bosnia & Herzegovina

Qatar

Bangladesh

Ecuador

Latvia

Zimbabwe

Kyrgyzstan

Slovenia

Tunisia

Armenia

Bahrain

Oman

Lebanon

Dominican Republic

Tajikistan

Macedonia, FYR

Jordan

Yemen

Mongolia

Jamaica

Myanmar

Kenya

Angola

Sri Lanka

Uruguay

Bolivia

Guatemala

Sudan

Albania

Cyprus

Zambia

Ghana

Cameroon

Brunei*

Panama

Cote d'Ivoire

Congo, Dem. Republic

El Salvador

Costa Rica

Gabon

Bahamas

Honduras

Senegal

Tanzania

Nicaragua

Ethiopia

Mozambique

Iceland

Paraguay

Papua New Guinea

Suriname

Botswana

Congo

Malta

Afghanistan

Guyana

Mauritius

Madagascar

Mauritania

Nepal

Uganda

Cambodia

Guinea

Equatorial Guinea

Haiti

Liberia

Benin

Barbados

Fiji

Namibia

Malawi

Sierra Leone

Niger

Togo

Burkina Faso

Swaziland

Laos

Rwanda

Mali

Antigua & Barbuda

Djibouti

Belize

Eritrea

Seychelles

Maldives

Central African Republic

Burundi

Chad

Saint Lucia

Guinea-Bissau

Gambia

Bhutan

Cape Verde

Solomon Islands

Grenada

Nauru

Lesotho

Samoa

Saint Vincent & Grenadines

Tonga

Saint Kitts & Nevis

Vanuatu

Sao Tome & Principe

Comoros

Dominica

Palau

Kiribati

Cook Islands

Niue

 

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