British-based organization rules B.C.'s pink salmon fishery sustainable

Ruling a major boost for marketing efforts.

Photo of Steveston fishing fleet courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

There was good news this week for BC's pink-salmon fishery as a noted British-based group deemed the industry sustainable -- a key ruling for marketing efforts.

The Canadian Press has gthe story:

VANCOUVER -- An international non-profit organization says British Columbia's pink-salmon industry is good enough for environmentally conscious consumers.

B.C.'s Ministry of Agriculture has announced that the British-based Marine Stewardship Council has certified all of the province's pink-salmon commercial fisheries as sustainable.

The announcement means the fisheries also minimize environmental impacts and meet local, national and international laws.

Agriculture Minister Don McRae says consumers can enjoy B.C.'s pink salmon, knowing the product comes from a sustainable fishery.

B.C. pink salmon worth about $22-million was exported to 26 countries in 2010.

The Marine Stewardship Council is also assessing the province's chum salmon and spiny-dogfish fisheries.

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