Cannabis-minded Canadians react to efforts to legalize marijuana in U.S.

Photo courtesy of Bigstock Photo

The peaceful forests, snow-capped peaks and glittering blue lakes of BC’s Kootenays did nothing to soothe the mind of BC Bud Boy, a young dope dealer who was always looking over his shoulder, fearing rivals were out to get him.
 
From 1996 when he was 17 to 2004, Bud Boy hung out on street corners peddling marijuana to people in his town under the shadow of those seemingly tranquil mountains, and also smoked it by the ounce as he mingled with people he described as “pretty shady characters”.
 
“You’re always looking over your shoulder, you always sleep with one eye open, always worrying that someone’s going to storm in and rip you off,” said Bud Boy.
 
Now Bud Boy is clean and has rebuilt his life, owning an honest, lawful business on the prairies where he lives with his pregnant fiancée in their new house, having left behind the fear, grubby cash, Ziploc bags of dope and paranoia that often comes with long-term drug use.
 
Years after Bud Boy put his shady past behind him, lawmakers south of the border in Washington, Oregon and Colorado are pushing forward with referendums to legalize marijuana on November 6, the same day of this year’s presidential election.

If passed, ballot measures in these three states would allow adults over 21 to possess small amounts of pot that would be regulated and taxed by their respective state, and includes driving laws to prevent drug-driving.

A 25 per cent sales tax would be imposed on weed, which would be sold out of stand-alone stores, with 40 per cent of profits going to state and local budgets, the rest to preventing and researching drug abuse.

Opinion polls are neck and neck in Washington and Colorado with Washington Initiative 502 most likely to pass. Oregon's bill, which imposes the fewest regulations, isn't likely to pass.

These referendums come just two years after Proposition 19 in California, also known as the Regulate, Control, and Tax Cannabis Act was defeated by a 53.5 per cent 'No' vote, in a statewide poll on November 2, 2010.
 
“It would push Canada to legalize pot as it wouldn’t be fair for them to be so close to US states that allowed it,” said Bud Boy.
 
If marijuana was legalized, marijuana growers and dealers would have a choice: either work for state governments or go out of business, according to Bud Boy.
 
If he had a chance, Bud Boy wouldn’t vote in any referendum on legalization, keeping a neutral stance between prohibition and government regulation of pot sales.
 
“I just think drugs are drugs, just as booze is booze,” said Bud Boy.
 
But Jodie Emery, longtime pot legalization activist, editor of Cannabis Culture magazine, and wife of BC's 'Prince of Pot' Marc Emery, who’s now in a US jail, was overjoyed that voters in three states would have a chance to legalize dope.


Jodie Emery protesting outside the North Fraser Pretrial Centre where Marc was held in maximum security remand for 52 days in 2009; Photo courtesy of Facebook Jodie Emery Facebook page

The Washington, Oregon and Colorado referendums come two years after Marc surrendered to US authorities and was jailed for five years, minus time served, after pleading guilty to one count of drug distribution, in a plea bargain he struck with prosecutors.
 
“Marc and I are both official endorsers of I-502 in Washington, which is a bill sponsored by Marc’s former prosecutor John McKay, who’s now an advocate for ending prohibition,” said Emery.
 
In 2010, Emery was invited to testify at the state Ways and Means Committee in Olympia, Washington, in favour of I-502, where she met McKay, now a law professor at Seattle University, for the first time.

“We’re the only cannabis advocates supporting this bill. I-502 is strictly politically mainstream with Republicans, Democrats and law enforcement on board. We think it’s wonderful that our neighbouring state is willing to pass legalization into law and more people support this than oppose it. It looks like it’s going to pass and that’s because it’s politically mainstream,” said Emery.
 
According to Emery, many people in Washington who make money off selling dope, including medical marijuana growers, will vote no and are misinforming the public ahead of November 6.
 
“Marc and I are proud to be on the side of those politicians working on passing I-502,” said Emery.
 
Meanwhile her husband Marc is writing a blog from his jail cell in Yazoo City Prison, Mississippi, and has also started a band with fellow inmates. His release date is scheduled for July 9, 2014.
 
Back in BC, Vancouver Seed Bank storeowner Rebecca Ambrose said legalization in any of the three states would be positive, but it really depended on the wording of bills like I-502.
 

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Cannabis Laws ruled no force and effect?

So please correct me if I'm wrong but you can no longer be convicted of possessing cannabis in Canada even if it is for recreational use. I present this to you based upon the following:

The Supreme Court of Canada recently declared there can be no conviction unless there are

"circumstances that create a realistic risk of danger to persons or property." 


thus making this case law. 

"The characteristics of marihuana were detailed by the Supreme Court in R. v. Malmo –Levine; R. v. Caine, 2003 SCC 74 (CanLII), [2003] 3 S.C.R. 571 at para. 192, where the Court stated:

The findings of fact made by the trial judges in Caine and Clay are similar in all respects (they are set out in full in Para. 40 of the reasons for judgment of Howard Prov. Ct. J. in the Caine appeal, and in para. 25 of the reasons for judgment of McCart J. in the Clay appeal). In Clay, McCart J. made the following findings of fact, which were accepted by [page 664] Rosenberg J.A. at the Court of Appeal for Ontario (at Para. 10):

1. Consumption of marihuana is relatively harmless compared to the so-called hard drugs and including tobacco and alcohol.

2. There exists no hard evidence demonstrating any irreversible organic or mental damage from the consumption of marihuana;

3. That cannabis does cause alteration of mental functions and as such, it would not be prudent to drive a car while intoxicated;

4. There is no hard evidence that cannabis consumption induces psychoses;

5. Cannabis is not an addictive substance;

6. Marihuana is not criminogenic in that there is no evidence of a causal relationship between cannabis use and criminality;

7. That the consumption of marihuana probably does not lead to hard drug use for the vast majority of marihuana consumers, although there appears to be a statistical relationship between the use of marihuana and a variety of other psychoactive drugs;

8. Marihuana does not make people more aggressive or violent;

9. There have been no recorded deaths from the consumption of marihuana;

10. There is no evidence that marihuana causes a motivational syndrome;

11. Less than 1% of marihuana consumers are daily users;

12. Consumption in so called decriminalized states does not increase out of proportion to states where there is no decriminalization;

13. Health related costs of cannabis use are negligible when compared to the costs attributable to tobacco and alcohol consumption."

You can prove to the court that the Supreme Court has already ruled on even the recreational use, as possessing and or consuming marijauna poses no circumstances that create a realistic risk of danger to persons or property. And the Supreme Court has already ruled on both of these factors. 

You just can not be found guilty. Sorry Mr Harper.

What do you guys think? sources....http://www.torontosun.com/2012/11/02/drunk-sleeper-behind-the-wheel-faces-the-music and http://canlii.ca/t/fl0vv

Reality check for legalizing drugs.

Dopey Canadians

That's all we need.  Dopey Candians.

Anaphylaxis from Marijuana

I suffer from anaphylaxis to marijuana, the same condition that many Canadians suffer from, the most famous form being anaphylaxis to peanuts.

many times I have found myself trapped within a severe allergy attack and have to Be rushed to the hospital.

While many a fool think that no harm can come from recreational use, I wish you could be in my shoes and feel what your recreation does to me. If you only could feel what I feel and talk to my wonderful, emergency room caregivers who treat me as I am receiving the asthma protocol because I can't breath, itch everywhere (it feels like a million Maggots are doing the indy 500 under my skin), my atopic dermatitis flares up so bad i'm in pure agony for months after.

It is illegal for a reason. The smoke is thick and permeates everything around it in a way that cigarette smoke does not. when my neigbous light up I am trapped in my house I have to shut of the furnace so nothing can come into the house and I still have a reaction. What about my life, rights and freedoms!!!!

The time has come for the negative effects of marijuana on those who do not light up to be heard, if you touch pot and then touch me I have a reaction, if you smoke it and I get second hand I have a reaction... its not fair.

If legalized, I face an uncertain future, I will be a prisoner in my own home trying to avoid this allergen.
Its just not fair that I have to suffer so some retards can get high.

You're a liar

Gaby ponce wrote:

I suffer from anaphylaxis to marijuana, the same condition that many Canadians suffer from, the most famous form being anaphylaxis to peanuts.

many times I have found myself trapped within a severe allergy attack and have to Be rushed to the hospital.

While many a fool think that no harm can come from recreational use, I wish you could be in my shoes and feel what your recreation does to me. If you only could feel what I feel and talk to my wonderful, emergency room caregivers who treat me as I am receiving the asthma protocol because I can't breath, itch everywhere (it feels like a million Maggots are doing the indy 500 under my skin), my atopic dermatitis flares up so bad i'm in pure agony for months after.

It is illegal for a reason. The smoke is thick and permeates everything around it in a way that cigarette smoke does not. when my neigbous light up I am trapped in my house I have to shut of the furnace so nothing can come into the house and I still have a reaction. What about my life, rights and freedoms!!!!

The time has come for the negative effects of marijuana on those who do not light up to be heard, if you touch pot and then touch me I have a reaction, if you smoke it and I get second hand I have a reaction... its not fair.

If legalized, I face an uncertain future, I will be a prisoner in my own home trying to avoid this allergen.
Its just not fair that I have to suffer so some retards can get high.

Humans are incapable of being allergic to Cannabis, you're a liar if you claim you are. I'm asthmatic and light up everyday several times a day, it has no effect on my ability to breathe. 

If you are asthmatic like you said you were, you would undoubtebly have problems with cigarette smoke, but as you said you do not I find it impossible to believe any part of your story.

Go sell your lies to someone else, we all know this is just some conservative trying to stir the propoganda pot about "pot".

 

I just want to add that I am

I just want to add that I am not some conservitive freak i just have allergies and now I'm being discriminated against because of my  disease that I was born with that I had no choice of having thanks for kicking a girl when she is down

Thanks alot bro

I'm allergic to coffee

I'm allergic to coffee so I guess I should request that coffee shops close down and criminalize coffee. Even the smell of walking by a Sta*buc$s can give me a mild reaction. But I don't go around saying ban coffee. The same can be said for peanuts, shellfish and many other things that people are illergic to. I feel sorry for you if the second hand smoke creates a bad reaction for anyone but think of the thousands (if not millions) of people  that have found relief from there medical conditions by smoking pot or using various other pot related products like oil, butter etc... I'm sorry but I think the good far outweighs the bad. 

Vancouver Real estate

I think our Goverment Drug policies are really great so we don'e have to think that much about this marijuana matter ,

they will handle anything


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