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In their own words: demonstrators speak out against Harper's Enbridge pipeline decision

"Here, you see older people, people in suits, people from all walks of life. I think there's enough dissent in BC to stop this."  

Photo by Mychaylo Prystupa

"I’m a mortgage broker, a banker," said Krishna Mulder. "What these guys are doing is making decisions based on a very short period of time and neglecting the future. It’s my future, and if I were to have children, my children’s future too. And it’s completely  unacceptable."

"I don’t believe the economic benefit of one Canadian Tire store — which is what the economic benefit of this pipeline works out to be in BC — is worth putting that sort of risk into play. When you consider the livelihood of our fisheries and tourism industry, it’s very short-sighted. I feel can’t just sit down and watch this happen. I have to participate.”

Mulder was part of the large crowd gathered in front of the CBC building in downtown Vancouver last night to protest the federal government's decision to approve the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline. Young and old, Aborginal and non-Aboriginal people shouted and cheered as speakers voiced dissent against the controversial $7 billion project, which would carry diluted bitumen across over a thousand rivers in northern BC to a terminal in Kitimat. 

 
Photo of Krishna Mulder, right, and Morris Stephen, left. 

A young man who wished to remain unnamed told the Vancouver Observer he came down to protest because he empathized with BC's pipeline critics.

“I’m originally born and raised in Fort McMurray. I’ve been pro-oil my entire life until I came out here — then I saw the environment, and I understand why people are upset. I don’t want it either." 

He said although he used to be dismissive of pipeline opponents, he grew increasingly disillusioned by the oil sands industry over the last several years.

"I don’t like what’s going on (in Fort McMurray) anymore. If you look at tailings ponds, it’s disgusting. That's not sustainable. Yes, it is Canada’s economic future, but it’s terrible what’s happening.” 

Despite the euphoric mood at the rally, a handful of observers seemed resigned to the idea that Northern Gateway would soon be built. 


Photo by Jenny Uechi

“I don’t think industry is going to be be satisfied until we have nothing left," said Gootchahoo, a Tlingit First Nation member. He stood watching the protests  from a slight distance. 

"They are going to get away with Northern Gateway. It’s unfortunate. It’s very sad. The government and industry has been getting away with genocide for 500 years so what’s going to stop them now? It’s just more of the same, right?”  

Sixteen-year-old Jacqueline Lee-Tam covered herself in black paint, saying:

"I am dressed like this, because this is what I'm going to be cleaning up when I am older," said Lee-Tam.

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Comments

Kick it up

BC isn't going to do much unless we kick it up a notch and protest all summer. Alberta will be watching us and Enbridge.  Let's get a little militant.

Or

...brilliant, not militant.

Pipelines to Hell.

I live in Alberta and I find the actions of our governments reprehensible, They are willfully ignorant of the repercussions that their decisions will bring. I am 100% opposed to the Northern Gateway, Kinder Morgan and Keystone pipelines, gas frakking and coal generated power. Canada needs to turn a 180 and invest in solar, wind, tidal and geothermal energy production - those are the answers to our energy needs.  The Coal, Oil and Gas era must end and soon if we are to preserve our planet.

this oil mess

We can't be placid, we can't be doormats..we need to stand up and yell loudly about this.  Harper has his ears closed..let's make him sit up and take notice.   He is an elected official..elected by the people...we can UNELECT him, he's not a god,  he might think he is.    He's not doing this for anyone but himself and the big oil companies.   I am sure once he's done all the damage he came here to do..he'll disappear just like Mulroney did..employed by some big corporate entity..in the USA,  he too was a Conservative.  Funny thing that,  you would think that conservative means to conserve, even protect..but this federal party doesn't do that.  It tosses out laws meant to do that..to pave the way for its filthy pipeline.  And NO doesn't even register on his brain.  He thinks he has carte blanche to do as he wishes.   Time we woke him up to the fact...that he's "not all that."

G in BC

Harpers denial

I realize that Harper is completely in denial, hanging onto the money he is getting from the Oil barons hoping to get realected.
But with all the people together it will never happen. I live on a beautiful gulf island and have been here for 36 years. Our water  is clean our ocean water also.  We KNOW we have to save our shores from dirty oil.  We wont give up to stop dirty oil from coming in our waters.

 

No Tar Sands in BC

The tar sands have to be refined on the tar sands.

Assessment

""I don’t believe the economic benefit of one Canadian Tire store — which is what the economic benefit of this pipeline works out to be in BC — is worth putting that sort of risk into play."...now that reflects just how little some of these people know about these types of projects and just shows how their views are not only unsubstantiated by any concrete assessment. All pipelines result in a payment of tolls to owners of land where they go through, be it private, municipal or provincial. To compare just this component of the economic activity to a single Canadian Tire store is totally inaccurate

Counter Point

Jean McLaren wrote:

I realize that Harper is completely in denial, hanging onto the money he is getting from the Oil barons hoping to get realected.
But with all the people together it will never happen. I live on a beautiful gulf island and have been here for 36 years. Our water  is clean our ocean water also.  We KNOW we have to save our shores from dirty oil.  We wont give up to stop dirty oil from coming in our waters.

 NIMBY arguments hold no water when it comes to projects that can have a positive impact on the nation as a whole

Counter Point

Earl Richards wrote:

The tar sands have to be refined on the tar sands.

 

They are upgraded there - to build complete refineries just does not make any sense

Counter Point

Chris Hooymans wrote:

I live in Alberta and I find the actions of our governments reprehensible, They are willfully ignorant of the repercussions that their decisions will bring. I am 100% opposed to the Northern Gateway, Kinder Morgan and Keystone pipelines, gas frakking and coal generated power. Canada needs to turn a 180 and invest in solar, wind, tidal and geothermal energy production - those are the answers to our energy needs.  The Coal, Oil and Gas era must end and soon if we are to preserve our planet.

 

Any simple research will tell you that to implement large scale energy alternatives the result is more expensive to the economy plus those technologies are not enough to replace existing demand for energy.

This production is headed off shore where we have no input as to the source of energy those buyers should or should not have access to. As studies after studies have shown, restricting supplies never works and as long as there exists a demand for our oil, we do have an obligation to meet that demand with our reserves. Cutting off our nose to spite our face is a silly policy to have and no politician in his right mind would ever pursue one.

Stand Strong

Stand Strong!

Stand United!

of One Heart <3

i protest for those with no voice ~ my future generations.

my ancestors, my great grandparents, my grandparents, my parents, and myself have lived off our pristine lands & waters since time immemorial.

is it so wrong to want to "save" these pristine lands & waters For our future generations?

Money Talks, BS Walks

Being able to put the long term job numbers into perspective as something akin to a Canadian Tire store is quite helpful.

I read on the Northern Gateway Project's own website that the numbers would be 560 long term jobs in BC. 
http://www.gatewayfacts.ca/benefits/benefits-to-b.c./

But then I also read a paper funded by the Research Council of Canada, the University of BC, Vancity Credit Union and the Vancouver Foundation. I found this unbiased study to point holes in Enbridge's math. It appears as though the actual number of long term jobs this pipeline will create locally in BC is a fraction of what Enbridge is stating.

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publication...

So the question is, "what is the actual number of long term jobs that will be created in BC?"

"On an operating basis, Enbridge estimates 104 permanent jobs in BC and Alberta, half of which would be in Kitimat. The company states local residents will be hired, but workers could easily be moved into the region from elsewhere. In addition, another 113 people will be employed at Kitimat terminal facility. These 217 permanent jobs, however, are estimated to increase five-fold to 1,146 total jobs per year through input-output modeling of indirect and induced employment."

The 560 they are quoting is based upon assumptions for increased labour proportional to a higher volume of bitumen output. This is a big "if." Essentially, they are trying to bluff their actual economic benefit to BC. This is shameful!

The real number is how many they are scheduled to hire in permanent roles immediately after the construction. Taking from the academic study cited above; the number is half of 104, ie. 52 and 113 at the terminal... So 165. The staffing required to run a large Canadian Tire Store (inclusive of management, support and clerical roles).

So what's at risk? There were 15,500 people employed in fisheries at last count, 2007. There were 126,700 employed in tourism, 2011. 

http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/omfd/reports/BC-Fisheries-Aquaculture-Sector-20...

http://www.destinationbc.ca/getattachment/Research/Industry-Performance/...

It's nice to put into perspective the thousands of jobs in fisheries, tourism and recreation that we are risking for one Canadian Tire store. 165 Jobs versus 142,200. 

Even if it was the 560 jobs they claim it to be, shouldn't this be a simple decision? Question is, what is the total dollar value of political contributions made by the Oil industry to the conservative government and their propaganda machines? That is a much harder number to find.

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