Aquarium presents expert panel for discussion on impacts on BC of tsunami debris

The Vancouver Aquarium is convening a panel of local experts on September 10 from Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment Canada for an informative public talk on the ongoing effects in B.C. of the devastating 2011 tsunami in Japan.

The discussion, Japanese Tsunami Debris: Why We See the Debris in B.C., will delve into ways that debris from the tsunami has been making its way to Canada’s western coast, the potential environmental effects of such debris, and action that is being taken to address the issue. The event will even feature what some creative Canadians are doing to call attention to the problem of marine debris.

Additionally, just prior to the event, one of the speakers, “flotsam sculptor” and marine debris artist Peter Clarkson, will be providing a public tour of his artwork ‒ consisting of marine debris items, including from the 2011 Japanese tsunami ‒ that are featured throughout the Aquarium (see details below).

 The effect of the Japanese tsunami is one aspect of a much larger environmental issue of shoreline litter, which not only impacts our communities and waterways, but also the wildlife that depends on them, a press release from the aquarium said.

The evening is intended to increase public awareness of tsunami debris in B.C and to learn what can be done to address shoreline litter during this fall’s Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, presented by Loblaw Companies Limited, and a joint conservation initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium and WWF.

Event Details for Japanese Tsunami Debris: Why We See the Debris in B.C.

Date: Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Time:  7-9 p.m. (Public tour of Peter Clarkson’s marine debris artwork begins at 6 p.m.)

Location: Vancouver Aquarium, Stanley Park

Website: vanaqua.org/japanese-tsunami-debris

 

Experts include:

·         Jill Dwyer (program emcee), manager, Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

·         Dr. Richard Thomson, scientist in coastal and deep-sea physical oceanography, Ocean Sciences Division,Fisheries and Oceans Canada

·         Paul Kluckner, co-chair of the Canada/British Columbia Tsunami Debris Coordinating Committee and Regional Director General, West & North, Environment Canada

·         Peter Clarkson, “flotsam sculptor” and marine debris artist. Clarkson’s art is featured throughout the Aquarium, and he will conduct a public tour starting at 6 p.m.

 

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