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Brazilian healer "John of God" comes to North America

 You may have seen him on Oprah, you may have read about him in her magazine, you may be one of many Salt Springers who have been to Brazil to be healed by him. 

John of God” or Joao Teixeira de Faria (or Joao de Deus—the Miracle Man-- as he’s known in Abadiania, Brazil), is coming to New York State’s lush Hudson Valley where the renowned Omega Institute (a 1940s boys’ camp in the woods) has been lucky enough to snag him for three days each year. There, about 5,000 lucky people  throng to sit in his trance-like healing midst and in the healing energies of the long-gone, invisible saints he channels in. 

Why the news?  Well, I’ve met many Vancouverites wishing to see John of God, and two weeks from now may be their easiest chance. And how did I get caught up in all this? Well, a few years ago, I was sitting in Salt Spring Books, using one of the computers when I happened to see a man next to me online, viewing photos of beautiful Amazon scenery where a white-cloaked man was in most of the photos.

 

“Who’s that?,” I asked, ever-curious. “John of God -- You should see him,” he said.  A few similar auspicious incidents, and I did some research and was on the hunt for funds to fly there, for the three weeks suggested to stay, for a guide who would show me the way.  All to see a renowned Catholic healer who apparently channels in hundreds-of–year-old saints who then heal the masses in their midst.  Physical, spiritual, emotional healings; whatever one needs.

 

Just ask Fenton Loyola, one such Salt Spring Islander who had the luck to go to Brazil for psychic heart surgery eight years ago. After a bypass surgery in ’93, a cardiac infarction, and eight stents inserted into his cornonary arteries,  he was told he’d need a heart transplant. That’s when he took the leap to Brazil to see the famous healer.

 

“This is when I decided to go see John. Although I can say there has been no significant improvement to the muscle tissue,” he says. “I haven't had further deterioration either, as predicted by the cardio team. Also, I haven't been hospitalized since seeing John. I'm grateful for that!”

 

So grateful, in fact, that he brought back an “amethyst crystal bed” to help fellow islanders sample a taste of the energy for themselves. While not exactly a replica of Joao’s powers, its healing powers have enticed many islanders to visit Joao in the flesh.

 

Catholic, Jewish or Muslim—one sees all types visiting John of God. And, while not everyone is cured of their cancer or multiple chemical sensitivities (the reason I went to see Joao last fall), many are or at least to varying degrees. I went to be healed of lead poisoning, I left with a healed tailbone and concussion instead—the chronic pain caused by both of these faded away in a couple days, just by my sitting in a room full of saints invisible to my eyes. 

 

A few months of also drinking the blessed water most patients buy, I was finally sleeping through the night and my friend’s arthritis disappeared, as she reports. 

I’m returning this year, but hotel rooms are fast running out. Grab your’s before they’re all gone! John of God will appear Sept. 25-28. The Omega Institute (www.eomega.org) in Rhinebeck, NY , 1-877.944.2002. As of publishing date, rooms were still available in nearby Poughkeepsie-the Holiday Inn or Marriott Inn offering daily shuttles to Omega.

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